Movies on the Falklands War (1982): A List

To be honest, I am ashamed to have to admit that I know hardly anything about the Falklands War. Lucky I know where it is located but that is about it. No idea why it happened or what was going on. I remember the name of Margaret Thatcher somehow tied to it. That’s it. I wasn’t any less surprised that there had been a few movies on the war in the Falklands and I have made the resolution that I will at least try to watch one of those that I have collected for my list. If anyone knows the one or the other, let me know and advise, which one I have to watch. Without knowing any better, I think I would go for either Resurrected or This is England. The latter seems to be more about the fallout of the war than the war itself.

  • Los Chicos De La Guerra, directed by Bebe Kamin, (ARG 1984) mit Carlos Abbate, Luis Agustoni
  • An Ungentlemanly Act, directed by  Stuart Urban, (GB 199, TV) starring Ian Richardson, Rosemary Leach
  • Tumbledown, directed by  Richard Eyre (GB 1988, TV) starring Colin Firth, Paul Rhys, David Calder
  • Resurrected, directed by Paul Greengrass (GB 1989) starring Tom Bell, Rita Tushingham, David Thewlis, Rudi Davies
  • The Falklands Play, directed by Michael Samuels, (GB 2002) mit Patricia Hodge, James Fox, Michael Cochrane
  • Blessed by Fire aka Iluminados por el fuego directed by Tristán Bauer (ARG/ ESP 2005) starring Gastón Pauls, Pablo Riva, César Albarracín
  • This Is England, directed by Shane Meadows (GBR 2006) starring Thomas Turgoose, Stephen Graham, Jo Hartley, Andrew Shim
Advertisements

15 thoughts on “Movies on the Falklands War (1982): A List

  1. warmoviebuff says:

    Thanks for the list. I have never heard of any of them. I am vaguely familiar with the war, but watching some of these will encourage me to read more about the war. Anyone have suggestions about which one to start with?

    • You are welcome. It seems This is England is very good but the war is just in the background, it is the cause for the events. It seems as if the father of the kid was in it. I’ll have to find out myself.

      • ‘This Is England’ is tainted by Shane Meadows bizarre views of the war unfortunately. He paints a picture where no one understood why Britain went to war, and likens it to the shady dealings that took us to Iraq. I’m not sure if this is genuine ignorance, or some agenda that he has, but it gives the film a really strange angle that doesn’t really make much sense. If anything, the fallout of the war was a feel-good factor and renewed national pride, whether warranted or otherwise.

      • I get you. I have no idea whether he wanted it or not but I suppose he did. I still haven’t seen it. Thanks for the comment.

      • I’d agree with Jenks. The causes of, and fighting during, of the Falklands Conflict was very much in the public eye and with full support of the general public. Very much akin to the public response to Desert Storm aka Iraq War 1. To portray the Falklands as akin to the second Iraq war is either disingenuous and pushing a particular false viewpoint or an example of someone who doesn’t know his history.

      • I hadn’t thought of this similarity. I wonder whether this strong reaction doesn’t have something to do with the fact that both countries have never been invaded…

      • well..strictly speaking they were invaded by the Argentinians – which is the angle the Thatcher government very much used to the public to stir them up. More a direct comparison to the way the US used the attack on Pearl Harbour.

      • That’s actually what I meant. The reaction must have been so strong because until then, the UK was never invaded.

  2. warmoviebuff says:

    I found the summary of “Tumbledown” to be interesting, but it is not available on Netflix.

  3. […] 9. San Carlos (23rd May 1982) – British troops land at San Carlos Water. Although, British ships come under severe Argentine air attack in “bomb alley”, the Argentine’s Additionally you can check out: http://robertlindsay.wordpress.com/2011/01/17/is-the-white-iq-so-superior/ Related to this you can read: http://anyushka.wordpress.com/2011/01/20/decisive/ In addition you can check out this related post: http://thinkstrat.wordpress.com/2011/01/19/crispin-burke-and-courtney-messerschmidt-shi-lang/ On the same topic: http://prov3333.wordpress.com/2011/01/29/buenos-aires-argentina/ A great related post about this: https://allaboutwarmovies.com/2011/01/25/movies-on-the-falklands-war-1982-a-list/ […]

  4. TR says:

    “Blessed by Fire” is worth seeing for its Argentinian perspective on the conflict, illuminating the fact that most Argentinian soldiers sent were raw recruits from the warmer interior part of the country.

    Another interesting film that is not about the Falklands itself but rather about the contemporary Chilean-Argentinian border conflict is “Mi Mejor Enemigo”. Pinochet’s Chile did enough posturing to tie down the best mountain divisions of Argentina to the Chilean border during the war.

  5. antonio de los santos says:

    “Mi mejor enemigo” is about the “non-war” of 1978 .Chile and Argentina had a limit difference about wich the Beagle channel was.First HM the queen of UK, named by agreement of the two countries, declared that the channel was that wich left the Picton, Nueva and Lennox islands in the Chilean side.The Junta Militar of Argentina did’nt accept, and prepared a landing in the three islands, but the president Belaúnde Terry of Peru,a traditional allie of Argentina and enemy of Chile, was told about that and inmediately phoned the Pope, John Paul II. The Pope could stop the landing ,though the two countrie’s forces were rather “face to face” .The POPE sent a mediator,Cardinal Antonio Samoré, and finally after the Falklands war and fall of the last Junta, democratic president Alfonsín called an election to solve the problem.By the people’s will, the islands were given to Chile.

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s